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Gerry Armstrong (centre) called time on his 41-year Chair Umpire career Wednesday at the Aegon Championships.

Armstrong Calls Time As Chair Umpire

The British official is now going to become a full-time ATP Supervisor.

Gerry Armstrong called time on his 41-year Chair Umpire career Wednesday at the Aegon Championships. But the British official will now move into a full-time ATP Supervisor role and continue his work as Assistant Referee at The Championships, Wimbledon.

His first match in the chair had come in a 1974 Wimbledon mixed doubles, when Roger Becker and Virginia Wade played Yvonne Goolagong and Kim Warwick. His final match saw Pierre-Hugues Herbert and Nicolas Mahut beat Lleyton Hewitt and Thanasi Kokkinakis 7-5, 6-3 at The Queen’s Club, venue of the ATP World Tour 500 tournament.

"I think my highlight was umpiring the 1992 Wimbledon doubles final, when John McEnroe and Michael Stich beat Jim Grabb and Richey Reneberg 19-17 in the fifth set," Armstrong told ATPWorldTour.com. "It was a great match that went over two days."

Armstrong estimates he has umpired "around 6,000 matches" since 1987, when he became a full-time Chair Umpire. He was one of eight full-time officials contracted by the ATP in 1990, when it established its first tournament calendar.

Armstrong first started as a line judge at Wimbledon in 1973, becoming a Chair Umpire nine years later and umpired four men’s and women’s finals. He has umpired competitive matches featuring all 25 of the No. 1 players in the Emirates ATP Rankings.

He followed in the footsteps of his father, George, who was the Chair Umpire for the 1975 Wimbledon final between Arthur Ashe and Jimmy Connors.

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